Free Webinar: Integrating ACT into Behavior Analytic Service Models

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Watch the FREE webinar recording on ACT for Behavior Analytic Service Models.

Abstract

Behavioral repertoires that are free from the influence of problematic, rule-governed behavior can give way to behavior that is value-driven and focused on the present moment. Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) is a contemporary behavioral approach that focuses on several core processes involved in producing psychological flexibility and valued living. This session will show how ACT components focused on values, committed action, defusion and mindfulness can be implemented with consumers in behavior analytic service models.

The examples provided represent brief and low effort iterations of these techniques, showing that positive impacts may be measured despite lower dosages and intensities of these practices. We will share how behavioral measures can be employed to evaluate the effects of these practices on socially relevant behavior, and how protocols employing direct contingency management can be bolstered by adding features of ACT.

**1 BACB Type 2 CEU is available for purchase. The webinar is about 1 hour long.

WATCH THE FREE WEBINAR RECORDING

1 BACB Type 2 CEU available for purchase

WATCH RECORDING

Biography

Dr. Kendra Newsome earned her PhD in 2010 from the University of Nevada, Reno. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D) and a Licensed Behavior Analyst in the state of Nevada. She has served as the President for the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis and is a former Co-President of the Standard Celeration Society. Dr. Newsome is a Founding Director and Owner of Fit Learning, Reno – a Precision Teaching Learning Laboratory that has served over 1,400 families since 2004. Dr. Newsome is a regular contributor to scientific and professional communities on learning science and evidence-based instruction. She and her colleagues have pursued inquiries into the role of language and relational flexibility in the establishment of complex academic repertoires.